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Pride Campaign: The Philippines

Country: Philippines

Partner: Department of Environment and Natural Resources

Campaign Manager: Melania Dirain

Project Area: The Peñablanca Protected Landscape and Seascape

Principal Threats: Illegal logging, erosion, shifting agriculture

Campaign Goal: To protect and conserve the biological resources of Peñablanca Protected Landscape and Seascape (PPLS) for the beneficial use of the present and future generations

Flagship Species: Rufous hornbill (Buceros hydrocorax)

The Cagayan Callao Coves National Park, found within the Peñablanca Protected Landscape and Seascape, is actually named after the Rufous hornbill and Melania‚Äôs stakeholders supported this once abundant bird as her flagship species.

Campaign SMART Objectives:
  • Objective 1: By April 2006, at least 33% (up from 13% of the student-respondents of the survey) of the students shall understand the importance of the forest to their lives, their livelihood and wildlife and at least 42% (up from 22%) can correctly name three environmental effects of cutting trees (e.g. destruction and loss of habitat, lack of water, erosion or floods). For students (aged 6-15 years old), at least 20% increase in the number of students indicated from the pre-project and post-project survey quiz results shall understand the importance of the forest and can name three effects of cutting trees
  • Objective 2: By April 2006, at least 60% (up from 40%) of the farmers shall understand the importance of the forest to their lives, their livelihood and wildlife and at least 33% (up from 13%) will be able to correctly name three environmental effects of cutting trees (e.g. lack of water, soil erosion, flood, destruction and loss of wildlife habitat)
  • Objective 3: By April 2006, at least 54% (up from 34%) of housewives shall understand the importance of the forest to their lives, their livelihood and to the wildlife and at least 30% (up from 10%) will be able to correctly name three environmental effects of cutting trees (e.g. lack of water, soil erosion, destruction and loss of habitat for the wildlife)
  • Objective 4: By April 2006, at least 86% (up from 66%) of the general public shall understand the importance of the forest to their lives, their livelihood and to the wildlife and at least 64% (up from 44%) will be able to name three environmental effects of cutting trees (e.g. destruction and loss of wildlife habitat, lack of water, soil erosion or flood)
  • Objective 5: By the end of the project, at least 43% (up from 23%) of the fisher-residents can understand the importance of forest and wildlife laws and 60% (up from 40%) can identify illegal fishing activities as one of the threats that affects the marine and freshwater resources of the protected area
  • Objective 6: By the end of the program, at least 80% (up from 60%) of the local communities shall recognize and understand the various permitted and prohibited activities inside the protected area and increase from 15% to 35% the number of people who knows the present rate of penalties for violating the provisions of the Protected Area laws
  • Objective 7: By the end of the program, at least 27% (up from 7%) of the local community shall have reported any illegal activity, conduct a signature campaign (indicated by 5,000 signatures) for the total ban of forest resources harvesting inside strict protection zones and 2 out of the 18 barangays shall pass ordinances that will prohibit commercial harvesting of timber inside their barangays

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© Rare
Pride Campaign Manager Melania Dirain.



Index to CEPF-supported Pride campaigns

Related stories:
- November 2004, In Focus: Marketing Social Change
- August 2003, In Focus: Students Get Off to Strong Start for Conservation Education



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